Archive for ‘Miscellaneous’

01/03/2016

A bronze figure, possibly Chakrapurusha – earliest listed source, 1998

Likewise, this “rare and important” bronze figure (possibly the personification of Vishnu’s wheel, Chakrapurusha, possibly one of Shiva’s attendants) was made in India in the (late Kushan or early Gupta) third or fourth century and “acquired in Thailand in 1998“. If we knew its source, we could understand its design and appreciate the artist’s intentions. Unfortunately, Christie’s appears not to know.

Its auction estimate is $80,000-$120,000.

A rare and important bronze figure, possibly of Chakrapurusha. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 42, Sale 12255, Christie's, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

A rare and important bronze figure, possibly of Chakrapurusha. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 42, Sale 12255, Christie’s, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

01/03/2016

A bronze figure of Manasa – earliest listed source, 1998

This “important” bronze figure of the Hindu snake goddess Manasa was made in India in the (Pala period) twelfth century and “acquired in Thailand in 1998“. Was it mislaid in the intervening eight hundred years?

Its auction estimate is $120,000-$150,000.

An important bronze figure of the goddess Manasa. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 58, Sale 12255, Christie's, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

An important bronze figure of the goddess Manasa. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 58, Sale 12255, Christie’s, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

01/03/2016

A painting of Mahakala Brahmanarupa – earliest listed source, 1990s

This “unique” seventeenth-century painting of Mahakala Brahmanarupa from Tibet can only be traced back to an art exhibition in Germany on the 9th of May 1996 (or to the Zimmerman Family Collection “by the 1990s”). As it was described when it surfaced on the market (and included in Christie’s catalogue), it was “the finest and largest thangka yet to surface of Brahmanarupa”.

Its auction estimate is $400,000-$600,000.

An important black ground painting of Mahakala Brahmanarupa. Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Works of Art, Lot 201, Sale 12168, Christie's, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

An important black ground painting of Mahakala Brahmanarupa. Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Works of Art, Lot 201, Sale 12168, Christie’s, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

01/03/2016

A bronze figure of Padmapani – earliest listed source, 1996

This bronze figure of (a manifestation of the god of compassion, Avalokiteshvara) Padmapani was “acquired from Spink [and] Son, Inc., London” on the 8th of February 1996. It has been linked with Himachal Pradesh in India due to “stylistic elements”, but other stylistically similar objects have been found in Kashmir.

Its auction estimate is $100,000-$150,000.

A bronze figure of Padmapani. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 53, Sale 12255, Christie's, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

A bronze figure of Padmapani. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 53, Sale 12255, Christie’s, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

01/03/2016

A rare bronze figure of Maitreya – earliest listed source, 1994

This “rare” bronze figure of (the future Buddha) Maitreya, which came from Nalanda in India and was made in the seventh century, was on the London market “by 1994” (and was resold within London on the 25th of October 2000). It is so rare, indeed, that no-one appears to have known where it was in the intervening 1,300 years or how it arrived in London (or, indeed, when).

Its auction estimate is $250,000-350,000.

A rare bronze figure of Maitreya. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 47, Sale 12255, Christie's, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

A rare bronze figure of Maitreya. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 47, Sale 12255, Christie’s, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

01/03/2016

An important silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of Akshobhya – earliest listed source, 1994

This “important” silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of (the immovable/unshakable Buddha) Akshobhya was made in “Western Tibet” in the thirteenth century and “acquired in London” in “June 1994”.

Its auction estimate is $250,000-$350,000.

An important silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of Akshobhya. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 69, Sale 12255, Christie's, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

An important silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of Akshobhya. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 69, Sale 12255, Christie’s, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

01/03/2016

A bronze figure of Maitreya – earliest listed source, 1994

This bronze figure of (the future Buddha) Maitreya has been attributed to a “royal monk” (or prince), Nagaraja (988-1026), around 1025. As the Purang-Guge kingdom’s territories crossed present borders, it may come from “(either) Kashmir or Western Tibet”. Its earliest documented collecting history is almost a thousand years later. It was “acquired from Sotheby’s New York” on the 4th of June 1994.

Its auction estimate is $200,000-$300,000.

A bronze figure of Maitreya. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 51, Sale 12255, Christie's, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

A bronze figure of Maitreya. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 51, Sale 12255, Christie’s, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

01/03/2016

A buff sandstone figure of the Radiating Avalokiteshvara – earliest listed source, 1988

This “extremely rare”, uniquely Khmer Avalokiteshvara is a thirteenth-century statue from Cambodia. The statue’s face is “striking[ly] similar to portraits of King Jayavarman VII, who constructed Prasat Bayon (the Temple of Bayon) at Angkor, so Christie’s description is “Bayon style”. Has the sandstone sculpture been broken off its base at the lower leg? Its collecting history is only traced back to its sale through Christie’s Amsterdam auction house on the 1st of June 1988, since when it has been in the collection of Dr. and Mrs. William T. Price.

Its auction estimate is $200,000-$300,000.

A buff sandstone figure of the Radiating Avalokiteshvara. Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Works of Art, Lot 324, Sale 12168, Christie's, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

A buff sandstone figure of the Radiating Avalokiteshvara. Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Works of Art, Lot 324, Sale 12168, Christie’s, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

01/03/2016

A fine and rare silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of Maitreya – earliest listed source, 1987

Likewise, this “fine and rare”, silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of (the future Buddha) Maitreya, which was made in India in the (Pala period) twelfth century, was “acquired in Hong Kong in 1987“. Where in “northeast India” was it venerated? It has been associated with a time when pilgrims spread portable icons (particularly bronze sculpture) and texts “throughout the region”, but when and how did it leave India? Judging by Christie’s notes, Christie’s consignors don’t know and Christie’s customers don’t care.

Its auction estimate is $250,000-$350,000.

A fine and rare silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of Maitreya. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 59, Sale 12255, Christie's, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

A fine and rare silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of Maitreya. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 59, Sale 12255, Christie’s, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

01/03/2016

An important silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of Buddha Amitabha – earliest listed source, 1987

An “important”, silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of Buddha Amitabha, which was made in India in the eleventh or twelfth century (Pala period), was “acquired in Hong Kong in 1987“. Also, “traces of cold gilding on face and neck, as well the remains of blue paint in the hair, point to the sculpture having been venerated in Tibet”. Where in “northeast India” and Tibet was it venerated? When and how was it removed from its site of spiritual veneration in India or Tibet and exported to its site of aesthetic appreciation in the United States?

Its auction estimate is $150,000-$200,000.

An important silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of Buddha Amitabha. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 57, Sale 12255, Christie's, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

An important silver-and-copper-inlaid bronze figure of Buddha Amitabha. The Lahiri Collection: Indian and Himalayan Art, Ancient and Modern, Lot 57, Sale 12255, Christie’s, New York, USA, 15th March 2016.

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