Asia Week auction, WTF19: Cambodia – temples’ statues are easier to transport without arms…

Buddhist Art has a sandstone Khmer deity.

The description includes a one-word phrase, ‘Baphuon‘, which could merely express its style, but which could place its origins at a specific temple at Angkor Thom in Cambodia.

Is it from the temple of Baphuon?

It does not include any explanation of when or how the deity was acquired and transported.

How did the deity’s feet break off (or how did it break off from its feet)?

How did its left forearm and right arm break off?

Its left forearm would have pointed forward. I am not saying that the forearm was removed deliberately; obviously, it’s impossible to say that. But equally obviously, it’s impossible to ignore the fact that, without a forearm sticking out, the otherwise “flat” statue is far easier to transport in a far smaller package.

Male Deity. Khmer, Baphuon, 11th Century. Sandstone. 27.5 inches (70 cm).

Advertisements

3 Trackbacks to “Asia Week auction, WTF19: Cambodia – temples’ statues are easier to transport without arms…”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: